Resolutions

January kept me pretty busy, so I’m a little late to this. But better late than never. And as an Agile practitioner, I don’t think personal retrospectives should be limited to one time of year.

Review of 2014

Last year I wrote a blog entry listing my goals for 2014. As far as New Year’s resolutions go, I was relatively successful — about 50% of my goals accomplished. Unfortunately, my Open Source contributions weren’t as strong as I had hoped; while I released some of my own work, I didn’t do much else. I did increase my blogging; getting in on a weekly blogging pact helped immensely. I also increased my participation on the This Agile Life podcast to a level that I’m happy with. But the accomplishment I’m most proud of was giving a presentation at RubyConf.

Plans for 2015

I’d like to keep things rolling from last year, but crank up a few things. My plans are quite ambitious, so I don’t expect to get everything done by any means. But I think by setting the bar high, I’ll end up with a lot I can be proud of.

Job Hunting

Late last year, I took the jump into independent consulting. So far, I’ve really enjoyed it, and I’m booked up through April. My wife graduates in May, so we’ve got the possibility of moving if that makes sense. So I’ll be looking for consulting projects in town, but I’ll also be looking at jobs in San Francisco and Chicago. The possibilities are exciting, and I’ll be taking my time to find something just right.

Conferences

I was incredibly nervous leading up to my RubyConf presentation. Part of that was just the common fear of public speaking. For me, that only kicks in at around 100 people, and this audience was around 250. I think another reason was that I chose a really ambitious topic, and I kept finding more that I wanted to talk about, but wasn’t prepared for. But I think I did a pretty good job presenting an advanced topic. And I was so pumped by the sense of accomplishment as soon as I finished. So I’m hoping to do it more. I’ve already submitted a couple proposals, and plan to submit several more.

Blogging

I believe that blogging is important for me to get my thoughts down — for myself and to share with others. I was really successful last year when I had a partner to keep me honest, via a pact. So I’ve started up another pact this year, which will hopefully ensure I’ll keep things going. I’ve got a really long backlog of topics, so as long as I keep at it, I’ll have plenty to write about.

I also want to move away from WordPress to a static system — probably Middleman. I’ve got 2 major problems with WordPress. First, I no longer trust its security, nor the security of any application written in PHP. Second, it generates HTML every time someone requests a page, instead of when the content is updated. I find that to be a waste of resources, and problematic from a security standpoint. The main problem with moving to a static blogging system is that I really want to allow comments, pingbacks, and tweetbacks. So I’ll have to find a way to integrate those.

Programming Language Design

Last year I started thinking about programming language design, and started implementing a language tentatively called Brilliant. I’ve done a lot more thinking on the topic, and have a lot of notes. But I haven’t implemented much more yet. This year, I’d like to get my thoughts more organized, and write a series of blog posts on various aspects of language design. The most interesting part seems to be the trade-offs involved in the ways that various language features interact. So I’d like to make some progress on the language implementation, but more importantly, I’d like to get a lot of my design ideas written down.

I’m also going to spend a lot of time learning a bunch more programming languages, so I have a better understanding of possible features, combinations of features, and their interactions. I’ve already start with Elixir, Clojure, and Racket. I’m hoping to also look at OCaml, Factor, and Haskell. I’ll probably also take a look at the 2 “Seven Languages in Seven Weeks” books.

Agile Book

I think people often have trouble getting started with Agile. I started on a book last year, and got down quite a lot of good ideas. But I realized that I’m going to have a hard time organizing all those ideas into something coherent. Still, I’d like to try to get something out there that lets people get started with Agile. My idea is to present a toolbox of practices to get started with and build on that foundation over time with additional practices. Sort of a playbook on how to get started over the first 6 to 12 months and be successful. I want to make some progress on the book, at least enough to decide whether it’s worth the effort to finish it and self-publish it.

 

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